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Simple Sentences: Definitions, Examples, and Exercises | Learn Basic English Sentence Structure

    Feeling like you’re drowning in English grammar rules? Fear not! The key to mastering the English language lies in its foundation: simple sentences in English. In this guide, we’ll unveil the secrets to crafting concise and impactful English sentences.By learning how to construct clear and straightforward sentences, you’ll be well on your way to effective communication and expressing yourself with confidence. This is your key to unlocking fluency and mastery of the English language.We’ll guide you step-by-step through the nuances of sentence formation, so you can conquer even the most complex grammatical challenges.

    What is a simple sentence in English?

    A simple sentence is a sentence that has one independent clause, that means it has one subject and one verb. For example:

    • «She sings». (subject: «she», verb: «sings»)
    • «He runs fast». (subject: «he», verb: «runs», adverb: «fast»)
    • «They live in a big house». (subject: «they», verb: «live», preposition: «in», adjective: «big», noun: «house»)

    To form a simple sentence, you need to follow this basic formula:

    Subject + Verb + (optional modifier)

    A modifier is a word or phrase that adds more information or detail to the sentence, such as an adjective, an adverb, a preposition, or a noun phrase. For example:

    • «The dog barks». (no modifier)
    • «The dog barks loudly». (modifier: adverb «loudly»)
    • «The dog barks at the mailman». (modifier: preposition «at» and noun phrase «mailman»)
    • «The big, brown dog barks loudly at the mailman». (modifier: adjective «big and brown», adverb «loudly», preposition «at», and noun phrase «mailman»)

    You can also use conjunctions, such as and, but, or, and so, to join two simple sentences together and form a compound sentence. For example:

    1. «She sings and he plays the guitar». (two simple sentences joined by «and»)
    2. «He runs fast but he gets tired easily». (two simple sentences joined by «but»)
    3. «They live in a big house, or they rent a small apartment». (two simple sentences joined by «or»)
    4. «She sings so he plays the guitar». (two simple sentences joined by «so»).
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    A simple sentence should have at least one subject and one predicate. A subject is the person, place, thing, or idea that the sentence is about. A predicate is the part of the sentence that tells what the subject does or is. For example:

    • «Tom likes pizza». (subject: «Tom»; predicate: «likes pizza»)
    • «The sky is blue». (subject: «The sky»; predicate: «is blue»)

    A simple sentence can have multiple subjects which can be combined using conjunctions. They are called compound subjects. Likewise, a simple sentence can also have compound predicates.
    Compound predicates have two or more verbs, but they share the same subject/s.

    A simple sentence can have multiple subjects which can be combined using conjunctions. They are called compound subjects. Likewise, a simple sentence can also have compound predicates.
    Compound predicates have two or more verbs, but they share the same subject/s.

    A simple sentence can be transformed into a question by changing the word order or adding a question word.

    A simple sentence can be transformed into a negative sentence by adding the word like not, never, or no.
    Here the examples of compound predicates, questions and negative sentences:

    • «Tom and Jerry like pizza». (compound subject: «Tom and Jerry», predicate: «like pizza»)
    • «Tom likes pizza and pasta». (subject: «Tom», compound predicate: «likes pizza and pasta»)
    • «Tom likes pizza». -> «Does Tom like pizza?» (change word order)
    • «Tom likes pizza». -> «What does Tom like?» (add question word)
    • «Tom likes pizza». -> «Tom does not like pizza». (add «not»)
    • «Tom likes pizza». -> «Tom never likes pizza». (add «never»)

    Great! We have reached the end of this lesson. In the next video, we will learn about English Prepositions.

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